Corinthians dial up TIM extension

25 Sep 2013

Brazilian giant Corinthians has signed a two-and-a-half year extension to its shirt sponsorship deal with Italian telecommunications firm TIM.

The reigning FIFA Club World Cup champion became the first Brazilian team to partner with TIM in 2010, with the company having since expanded its involvement in the domestic game to sponsor 13 other clubs. TIM will now partner Corinthians through to January 2016 and will continue to have branding presence within the numbers on the back of the club’s shirts, along with displaying its logo at the team’s training ground.

Caixa Economica Federal holds Corinthians’ main shirt sponsor contract, with Nike and education company Fisk also enjoying presence on the jerseys. Fisk is sponsoring Corinthians through the 2013 season; with the Sao Paulo club having last year extended its deal with Nike through December 2022 for a reported US$144.2 million. Government-owned financial institution Caixa is paying $14.9 million for the right to display its logo across the front of the Corinthians’ shirts until the end of 2013. TIM’s new contract is reportedly worth $1.8 million per year. “The strategy of being close to Brazilian clubs, extolling a national passion, has shown promise,” said Livia Marquez, director of advertising and brand management at TIM Brasil. “Over the past three years, we have shared challenges and achievements with Corinthians. We have been together since 2010, during which time the club marked history with the achievements of the Campeonato Brasileiro, Copa Libertadores, Club World Cup, the Recopa Sudamericana and Paulistão.”

Caio Campos, marketing manager of Corinthians, added: “In an innovative initiative in Brazilian football we are with TIM, a multinational company that has stood out in its area since 2010. Renewing this sponsorship for another two and a half years reflects exactly what we seek in the department of marketing – combining the Corinthians brand with serious businesses and establishing long-term partnerships.”